NO THANKS BY RAMIRO E

Guilty Pleasures

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Jamie Williams, comes from Philadelphia.

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Working Girl (coffee break). Esther works at Swarovski.

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Working girl part two (lunch break). Celia is a psychologist, she works as a receptionist.

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Ona, RRPP student.

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Raquel, student with self customised tee shirt.

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Claudia. Audiovisual Communication student.

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As a streetstyle phtographer your are normally expected to look for some very specific kind of people and, as if there was an unwritten rule that guides you, a rule that provides the Do’s and Donts of Street Fashion Photography. When you spot someone who is “trendy” or “fashion victim” or “cool”, when someone looks like a blogger, then it is easy to stop and take his photo, for this purpose the streetsyle photographer has a license to shoot. When you shoot you are doing what’s  supposed to do.

This license and confidence may dissapear when the photographer’s gaze focus on styles of a different kind not so close to the fashion world. The streets are so full of photogenic people, full of girls with charm and sensuality ,the most inspiring attitudes may be across the road,here, there, anywhere. When you ask someone of that “different kind” to take his photo you know the reasons are not exactly the same as when you do the usual “streetstyle routine”, then the photographic act becomes a GUILTY PLEASURE. In these cases you stop feeling like a fashion professional and realize you are acting like a perverse voyeur. There was a line in David Lynch’s “Blue Velvet” film that said “I don’t know if you are a detective or a pervert” to which Kyle MacLachlan’s character replies “Well, that’s for me to know and you to find out”. This film scene comes to my head when I experiment these guilty pleasures.